• Babel, Pentecost, Glossalia and Philoxenia: No Language is Foreign to God

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (North American Christian Foreign Language Association, 2001)
    • Before or Outside the Text: A Comparative Study on Jean-Luc Marion and Paul Ricoeur's Idea of Revelation

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Tang, Joseph; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2010-05)
      This essay explores the idea of revelation of two French philosophers, Jean-Luc Marion and Paul Ricoeur. Ricoeur and Marion are very important figures not only in contemporary continental philosophy, but also in their contributions to the discussion of religion, or what some may call the "theological turn." Marion contends that revelation is the saturated phenomenon ' par excellence', free from the constraints of reason and metaphysics. For Ricoeur, a longer route in approaching the phenomenology of religion through the detour of hermeneutics is much needed. Such a longer path serves to concretely ground the discussion of revelation in a historic, linguistic, and textual milieu. Therefore, while Marion thinks that revelation is immediate and unconditionally given, Ricoeur maintains that revelation as manifestation names the possibility for biblical Scripture, and through hermeneutic interpretation, is able to open a world into which one might project one's ownmost possibilities.
    • Being and Being Known: the Place of Revelation in a Marcelian Ontology

      Olthuis, James H.; Wells, Jeffrey; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1987)
    • Beliefs and the Scientific Enterprise: a Framework Model Based on Kuhn's Paradigms, Polanyi's Commitment Framework, and Radnitzky's Internal Steering Fields

      Hart, Hendrik; Joldersma, Clarence W.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1983)
      In this thesis I attempt to develop an alternative to the logical positivist's image of science, which attempts to exclude beliefs from scientific investigations. First I set the problem up by describing what the positivists mean by belief and how they attempt to exclude belief through the use of the scientific method. I begin to develop an alternative by examining the views of three philosophers of science: Thomas S. Kuhn, Michael Polanyi, and Gerard Radnitzky. Each of them provides an alternative to the positivistic conception of science by suggesting that scientific research is surrounded by a framework of tacit beliefs. I present each view in the following way. First I describe the background and context for the framework hypothesis; then I explain the framework itself, including discussions on the nature of the framework, how it is acquired, its role in visible scientific activity, and how switches from one framework to another occur; finally I assess each person's insights, including each's relevance for my thesis. The examination of these views sets the stage for my last chapter. Here I briefly compare the three thinkers, noting similarities and differences. Then I highlight each thinker's unique insights. Finally, I present a brief description of what I believe is a viable alternative to the positivistic image of science, based on the work of the three philosophers.
    • Believing For Me: Žižek, Interpassivity, and Christian Experience

      Mackie, Carolyn J.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-05-02)
    • Bernard of Clairvaux on the Song of Songs: a Contemporary Encounter With Contemplative Aspirations

      Sweetman, Robert; Mols, Michael John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2007-08)
      Recent scholarship in biblical interpretation has remained suspicious of the "allegorical" approach to scripture, presumed as common to Medieval Christianity, and Bernard of Clairvaux is often acknowledged as paradigmatic of contemplative exegesis. Bernard's Sermons on the Song of Songs is often alleged to be an ultimate example of the dangers of monastic "allegorizing," in that such an approach lacks any consistency of method and maintains an ideological stance that is suspicious of and ultimately rejects the nature of bodily existence. This thesis counters these claims by utilizing the work of contemporary medievalists, instead of contemporary biblical exegetes, as a lens in a close reading of Bernard's Sermones Super Cantica, as well as his textual interaction with Peter Abelard and Peter the Venerable. This thesis suggests that Bernard is consistent in his method of performative reading and holds bodily existence as vital to the monastic and broader Christian way of life.
    • Beyond Freedom vs. Democracy: A Dooyeweerdian Contribution to the Individual - Collective Debate

      Macklem, Patrick; Marshall, Paul; Townshend, Roger; University of Toronto. Faculty of Law (1991-05)
    • Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment Unto Salvation in the Book of Revelation

      Ansell, Nicholas; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
    • Bonhoeffer and Berkouwer On the World, Humans, and Sin: Two Models of Ontology and Anthropology

      Olthuis, James H.; Bouma-Prediger, Steven; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1984-06)
    • Brandom and Hegel on Objectivity, Subjectivity and Sociality: A Tune Beyond Us, Yet Ourselves

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Koslowski, P.; DeMoor, Michael James; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2011-07)
      This dissertation is an exposition and critique of Robert Brandom's theory of discursive objectivity. It discusses this theory both within the context of Brandom's own systematic philosophical project and, in turn, within the ideas and questions characteristic of the Kantian and post-Kantian tradition in German philosophy. It is argued that Brandom's attempt to articulate a theory of the objectivity of discursive norms (and hence also of the content of discursive attitudes) resembles J.G. Fichte's development of themes central to Kant's philosophy. This "Fichtean" approach to the problem of objectivity is then compared and contrasted to that of G.W.F. Hegel. Though Brandom, Fichte and Hegel share the desire to derive an account of the conditions of objectivity from the social character is discursive practices, Hegel offers a version of this project that differs with respect to the nature of self-consciousness, sociality and truth. It is then argued that Brandom's theory suffers significant internal inconsistencies that could be avoided by adopting a more "Hegelian" approach to these three themes. More specifically, Brandom's own project requires that he recognize the necessity and irreducibility of firstperson and second-person discursive attitudes, as well as that he recognize the role of "I-We" social practices for discursive objectivity. Furthermore, he must include in his explanations some form of natural teleology and hence he must abandon his deflationary approach to semantic explanation. However, Brandom's methodological and metaphysical commitments prevent him from doing so.
    • Building a World Where Knowledge is Free

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-10-23)
    • Building with a Borrowed Axe

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2014-01-22)
    • Bursting the Banks: Matthew's Use of Israel's Wisdom Tradition

      Keesmaat, Sylvia C.; VanManen, Richard P.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008)
      One especially contentious issue for Matthew's predominantly Jewish-Christian audience is how to relate to Gentiles, who are also followers of Jesus and desire to be incorporated into their community. To address this issue, Matthew appeals to Israel's wisdom tradition, and particularly to the pilgrimage of Woman Wisdom. In this journey, Woman Wisdom is commanded to dwell in Israel. She makes her home there and calls all people to come to her for wisdom and life. Ultimately, Wisdom is rejected by Israel and she returns to God. This thesis proposes that it is this pilgrimage of Woman Wisdom that is an underlying metaphor for Matthew's gospel. Like Wisdom, Jesus arrives in Israel, calls Israel to follow him, and is ultimately rejected. Woman Wisdom's cry to come to her to receive life is echoed in Jesus' call for all to enter the kingdom of God. The inclusion of the Gentiles in the community therefore demonstrates the presence of the kingdom of God.
    • Calvin Seerveld - Address to the ARSS

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1965-08-25)
    • Calvin Seerveld - Aesthetics Seminar (session 1)

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977-07-05)
    • Calvin Seerveld - Aesthetics Seminar (session 2)

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977-07)
    • Calvin Seerveld - Aesthetics Seminar (session 3)

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977-07)
    • Calvin Seerveld - Aesthetics Seminar (session 4)

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977-07)
    • Calvin Seerveld - Aesthetics Seminar (session 5)

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977-07-13)