• Faith as the Art of the Possible: Invigorating Religious Tradition in an Amnesiac Society

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Institute for Christian Studies (The Other Journal, 2008-03-31)
    • Faith in Search of a Focus: an Integral Critique of the Faith Development Theory of James Fowler

      Olthuis, James H.; Chapko, John J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1985-08)
    • Faith, Knowledge and Science: A Systematic Exposition of the Thought of Michael Polanyi

      Seerveld, Calvin; Anastasiou, Harry; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1979)
    • Faithful Thinking and World Orientation: Augustine, Aquinas, Dooyeweerd, Olthuis

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
      This course is designed to examine four examples of Christian thinking about God, self and world within a religiously heterogeneous imaginative and thought world. The effort to think integrally within and about such a world is a throughline to be followed from any point in the ongoing tradition of Christian thought. The character of the world changes inexorably but its religious heterogeneity both imaginatively and conceptually is reaffirmed in and through all such changes. What it means to think in accord with one's faith, to think faithfully, then, will change as the world in which such thinking takes place changes, but the task of negotiating faithfulness in the context of imaginative and conceptual heterogeneity continues to challenge, bless and curse by turns. Augustine, Aquinas, Dooyeweerd and Olthuis illustrate both the challenge and opportunity of such an enterprise within the context of ancient Roman, high medieval, high modern and postmodern imaginative and conceptual contexts, respectively.
    • The Fall Into Modernity

      Hart, Hendrik; Douglas, Nigel Charles; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1989-05)
    • Fiction as Philosophy: Reading the Work of Christine de Pizan and Luce Irigaray to Write a Hermeneutics of Socially Transformative Fiction-mediated Philosophy

      Sweetman, Robert; Carr, Allyson Ann; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2011-06)
      This dissertation proposes to examine the work of scholars Christine de Pizan and Luce Irigaray in order to develop the possibilities of fiction in philosophy for the purposes of social transformation. Using four of her major narrative texts (The Mutacion of Fortune, the City of Ladies, the Path of Long Study and the Vision) I show how Christine employs the complex array of hermeneutical tools available to her in fictionalized ways as a means of training her readers into re-writing their understanding of themselves and their contexts. Alongside such re-writings, I show that she understands herself to have a particular vocation for educating the powers of France towards ethical action in their governance, and that she does so in these works in the form of philosophically oriented fictionalizations. I use the work of Luce Irigaray to explore a philosopher from the twentieth and twenty-first century who uses narrative and hermeneutical tools that bear a family resemblance to Christine's. Tracing Irigaray's formulations on the necessity of sexual difference I show how she re-tells stories from myth and history in such a way as to develop the sexual difference she desires. Finally, having engaged with these two philosophers, I use the hermeneutical work of Hans-Georg Gadamer to present my own work on how well-crafted fiction can be used to build philosophical concepts and understandings that are not yet available in our world, but which become available to us through our participation in the new fictionalized contexts and fictional worlds we create. I show how it is through understanding the possibilities this kind of philosophical and fictionalized utopic thinking holds that social transformation rooted in the world-building capabilities of individual persons can occur.
    • Finding Aid to the D.H.Th. Vollenhoven RHC Collection

      Institute for Christian Studies. Library; Institute for Christian Studies (2013)
    • Finding Aid to the Meijer Cornelius Smit Archives Collection

      Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016)
    • Forgiveness: the Gift and Its Counterfeit

      Olthuis, James H.; VanderBerg, James; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2002-11)
    • Forty Days Later on a Thursday

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-05-17)
    • Foucault, Levinas and the Ethical Embodied Subject

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Lok, Wing-Kai; Goris, W.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2011-07-05)
      This dissertation attempts to interrogate whether the postmodern anti-essentialist approach to the body can truly recognize the ethical value of the body. For the postmodernists, the value of the human body has long been repressed by Cartesian rationalism and dualism that privileges the mind over the body. Dualism is a form of reductionism that reduces either the mind to the body or the body to the mind. It not only fails to recognize an interaction between mind and body, but also privileges one side at the expense of the other. For instance, rationalism is a dualist reductionism since it always explains the body and matter in terms of mind or reason. Thus, dualism not only refers to a split or separation between mind and body, but also refers to a reductive relation between mind and body.
    • Frayed Anthems: When Creativity Scandalized America

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-06-25)
    • Freedom Un/Limited: a Sympathetic Critique of Libertarian Freedom in the Open Theism of Clark Pinnock

      Ansell, Nicholas John; Hocking, Jeffrey S.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008-12)
      This thesis lays out a critique of the libertarian autonomy in Clark Pinnock's open theism. It contends that libertarian autonomy (defined as the choice to do otherwise) is unable to do justice to the fuller sense of freedom described in the biblical narrative. Offering more than a critique, this thesis suggests an alternative definition of freedom by qualifying Karl Barth's "freedom as obedience" as 'freedom as faithfulness'. As such, true freedom is contrasted to the autonomy that leads to evil, and is found beyond the false dichotomy of compatibilism and incompatibilism, heteronomy and autonomy. Freedom is recognized as a good gift of creation and a promise of the eschaton, and thus must be distanced from the shadow of evil which haunts human autonomy. Ultimately, this thesis contends that faithfulness to God as the source and call of life leads to responsive, transformative, and eschatologically unlimited freedom.
    • From Cynical Reason to Spiritual Creativity: An Exercise in Religious Anthropodicy

      Sweetman, Robert; Dettloff, Dean; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015)
      This thesis explores the cultural ideology of cynicism as identified and critiqued by Peter Sloterdijk, who describes cynicism as an "enlightened false consciousness" that is "universal and diffuse." As an ideology, cynicism perpetuates the conditions of unjust society, but it is impervious to criticism. Instead of further critique, the thesis suggests religious traditions can offer means of overcoming the enclosure of cynical consciousness. Chapter one outlines Sloterdijk's approach to cynicism, including its historical development. Chapter two considers cynicism as a problem of self-understanding and proposes religion reveals that human beings are malleable through practices and techniques. Chapter three looks at three such techniques--awareness, compassion, and creativity--and offers them as solutions to cynical consciousness. The thesis aims, overall, to offer a way of considering the continued relevance and possibility of religious traditions, practices, and techniques to a cynical society such that alternative self-understandings and alternative social configurations might be made possible.
    • From Ground to Ocean: Robinson and Keller at the Beginnings of Divinity

      Ansell, Nicholas John; Basden, Stuart Jeffrey; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2007-09)
      Observing the movement in recent Christian theology, I examine the change in depth metaphors and theological works, as they move from tendencies of solidity and proposition-forming, to more fluid imaginations in their substance and style. I conduct an indirect comparison between John A.T. Robinson and Catherine Keller, engaging Buber, Tillich and Virginia Mollenkott, specifically focusing on themes of depth and working through a filter of social and ecological justice.Throughout the essay I acknowledge the importance of the continuing re-articulation of theology, the necessity of exploring the roots of Christianity, and I affirm the need for new language for the task of articulating an appropriate image of divinity and humanity. I contend that while Keller is well able to continue Robinson's theological project for the next generation, his work is still valuable in contributing Christology and New Testament studies, both of these being somewhat absent from Keller's work.
    • From Paradox to Possibility: Gauging the Unique Contribution of Christian Voices to the Public Discussion of Ecological Crisis

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Gerritsma, Sara L.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008-12)
      This thesis argues that western societies are caught in a paradox: Individuals and groups are increasingly concerned about the harmful effects humanity is having on the earth's health, while at the same time environmental degradation increases and societies are doing relatively little to stop environmentally harmful actions. Chapter 1 explores the deeper roots of our current situation, arguing that westerners are caught up in a harmful ideology that prioritizes economic growth and material prosperity at all costs, which means that steps to protect the environment will not be undertaken if these steps will have negative (or even neutral) impacts on economic growth. Suggesting a theocentric (God-centered) alternative to this harmful ideology, chapter 2 defends the expression of openly religious perspectives in the public political discussions of environmental crises but also emphasizes the responsibility of all participants to dialogue in a respectful, civil manner and to be open to truths coming from marginal perspectives. Finally, chapter 3 gives a number of concrete suggestions for public policies that can address the roots of ecological degradation and engage citizens who are ready and willing to take steps to reduce their environmental footprint.
    • Futurity and Creation: Explorations in the Eschatological Theology of Wolfhart Pannenberg

      Olthuis, James H.; Walsh, Brian John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1979-07)
    • Glory to God in the Kitchen—Art Exhibition and Reception

      Smick, Rebekah; Post, Ann; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2019-06-26)
      My series of six, still life oil paintings were small in size. Including the frames, five out of the six paintings measured 12 by 16 inches, and one was 9 by 11inches. Initially, I hung the pictures on two, free-standing display panels facing each other in the center of the rotunda, which was well lit and easily seen from the entrance. I also included another panel displaying two small-framed posters designed to match the framed paintings. These advertised the show and included the date and time for the closing reception. I also included an additional framed piece with a brief biography and artist’s statement. The original intent was for the small exhibit to remained on display throughout the month of October. However, the library decided to extend the show into the month of November. After the first month it became clear that the artwork was dwarfed by the large gallery space and the library called to inquire if I might add more artwork to fill out and to expand the show. I agreed to add a few more painted floral paintings which I completed a year before as well as a landscape painting with an autumn color palette. I was concerned that adding additional works that were not directly related to the still life series and theme would dilute the impact and change the mood of the show. I did so reluctantly at first, but I had to admit that the original series of six small canvases appeared “lost” in the gallery space and that adding extra art for an additional month was an appropriate and reasonable request. So, I added the additional pieces which were slightly larger in size- when framed, they measured :14 by 18 inches; 16 by 20-inches and 18 by 24 inches. The extra art did indeed manage to “fill the space in a beautiful way”— to quote Georgia O’Keeffe —when asked to explain the purpose of art. My fear of adding the other pieces turned out to be unfounded and the show “pulled together” quite nicely. The floral paintings and the landscape additions turned out to harmonize well with the original still life paintings and when viewed all together were not at all discordant, but actually created a unified display which appeared visually connected. The viewing public seemed well pleased and the show received numerous compliments and positive comments from library patrons and others who were passing by as I was hanging the paintings. I tried to be as respectful and as quiet as possible while hammering and using various hardware necessary to create the display. Library patrons walked freely throughout the gallery while the show was going up on the walls and some seemed to enjoy watching the process; while others were curious and asked questions about the artwork.
    • Good Cities or Cities for the Good? Radical Augustinians, Societal Structures, and Normative Critique

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Smith, James K. A.; Olthuis, James H.; Institute for Christian Studies (Baker Academic, a division of Baker PublishingGrand Rapids, Mich., 2005)
    • Grace as an Aesthetic Concept

      Smick, Rebekah; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)