• Glory to God in the Kitchen—Art Exhibition and Reception

      Smick, Rebekah; Post, Ann; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2019-06-26)
      My series of six, still life oil paintings were small in size. Including the frames, five out of the six paintings measured 12 by 16 inches, and one was 9 by 11inches. Initially, I hung the pictures on two, free-standing display panels facing each other in the center of the rotunda, which was well lit and easily seen from the entrance. I also included another panel displaying two small-framed posters designed to match the framed paintings. These advertised the show and included the date and time for the closing reception. I also included an additional framed piece with a brief biography and artist’s statement. The original intent was for the small exhibit to remained on display throughout the month of October. However, the library decided to extend the show into the month of November. After the first month it became clear that the artwork was dwarfed by the large gallery space and the library called to inquire if I might add more artwork to fill out and to expand the show. I agreed to add a few more painted floral paintings which I completed a year before as well as a landscape painting with an autumn color palette. I was concerned that adding additional works that were not directly related to the still life series and theme would dilute the impact and change the mood of the show. I did so reluctantly at first, but I had to admit that the original series of six small canvases appeared “lost” in the gallery space and that adding extra art for an additional month was an appropriate and reasonable request. So, I added the additional pieces which were slightly larger in size- when framed, they measured :14 by 18 inches; 16 by 20-inches and 18 by 24 inches. The extra art did indeed manage to “fill the space in a beautiful way”— to quote Georgia O’Keeffe —when asked to explain the purpose of art. My fear of adding the other pieces turned out to be unfounded and the show “pulled together” quite nicely. The floral paintings and the landscape additions turned out to harmonize well with the original still life paintings and when viewed all together were not at all discordant, but actually created a unified display which appeared visually connected. The viewing public seemed well pleased and the show received numerous compliments and positive comments from library patrons and others who were passing by as I was hanging the paintings. I tried to be as respectful and as quiet as possible while hammering and using various hardware necessary to create the display. Library patrons walked freely throughout the gallery while the show was going up on the walls and some seemed to enjoy watching the process; while others were curious and asked questions about the artwork.
    • Good Cities or Cities for the Good? Radical Augustinians, Societal Structures, and Normative Critique

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Smith, James K. A.; Olthuis, James H.; Institute for Christian Studies (Baker Academic, a division of Baker PublishingGrand Rapids, Mich., 2005)
    • Grace as an Aesthetic Concept

      Smick, Rebekah; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
    • Granting Amy a Fair Hearing

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-07-30)
    • The Great Turning Point: Religion and Rationality in Dooyeweerd's Transcendental Critique

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (Society of Christian Philosophers, 2004-01)
      Hugo Meynell objects to the apparent fideism and anti-foundationalism of Herman Dooyeweerd's philosophy. In response, my essay explicates the historical setting and logical structure to Dooyeweerd's "transcendental critique of theoretical thought." His transcendental critique seeks to uncover the "religious root" of philosophy and of other academic disciplines. Given Dooyeweerd's notion of religion and his account of theoretical thought, I show that Meynell's criticisms are misplaced. Yet they point toward fundamental problems in Dooyeweerd's transcendental critique. Some problems pertain to the logic of Dooyeweerd’s argument, and others to his notion of religion. I explain these problems and indicate how they should be addressed.
    • Hannah Arendt and the Disappearance of the Political in the Modern Age

      Zylstra, Bernard; Koyzis, David Theodore; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1982-01)
    • Hart and Plantinga On Our Knowledge of God

      Hart, Hendrik; Huisman, John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2004-08)
      The thesis explores and takes a stand with respect to the differences between the religious epistemologies of Alvin Plantinga and Hendrik Hart. For Plantinga, direct rational knowledge of God "in Himself" is possible because it is grounded in the experience of our rational faculties. For Hart, direct rational knowledge of God's nature is impossible because God transcends the created order and, therefore, the limits of rational understanding. Our knowledge of God, as a consequence, can only be faith knowledge that is decidedly indirect and metaphoric in nature. Plantinga believes that such views are Kantian in inspiration and that they turn our knowledge of God into nothing more than rationally incoherent "disguised nonsense." The thesis shows that Plantinga's own philosophical theology fails to meet the rational standards he sets for religious knowledge, his critique of Kantian religious epistemologies fails to apply to Hart's position, and that he himself allows for indirect knowledge of God in certain instances. The thesis concludes by noting if our knowledge of God can be indirect in some instances without also being rationally incoherent disguised nonsense, then perhaps Hart is not wrong for regarding it to be indirect in all instances.
    • Haunting Conceptual Boundaries: Miracles in the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas

      Sweetman, Robert; Goering, Joseph; Guardiani, Francesco; Silano, Giulio; Institute for Christian Studies (LEGASNew York, 2005)
      Thomas understands our creaturely being under two contiguous categories: nature and grace, or the natural and the supernatural. In this two-fold understanding of the creaturely whole, miracle names a reality that haunts the boundary between. Is the result seamless harmony? Or seismic activity?
    • Hayden White on Historical Narrative: a Critique

      McIntire, Thomas; Frederick, Gay Marcille; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1992)
    • "The Heart Has Reasons That Reason Cannot Know": Thinking, Feeling, and Willing in Learning

      Blomberg, Doug; Institute for Christian Studies (Kuyers Institute for Christian Teaching and Learning and The Association of Christian Teachers, 2013)
    • Hendrik Hart - Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Analysis Model

      Hart, Henk; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1973)
    • Hendrik Hart - Philosophical Problems I

      Hart, Henk; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1970)
    • Hendrik Hart - Philosophical Problems II

      Hart, Henk; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1970)
    • Hendrik Hart - Philosophical Problems III

      Hart, Henk; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1970)
    • Hendrik Hart - Untitled

      Hart, Henk; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1970)
    • Henrik Hart - Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Analysis Model

      Hart, Hendrik; Institute for Christian Studies
    • The Herman Dooyeweerd Library Collection: Author-Title Citations

      Institute for Christian Studies. Library; Guthrie-McNaughton, Isabella; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-10)
    • The Hermeneutics of Ancient Astronaut Theory

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-05-21)
    • Holy Worldliness

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (CRC Publications, 1988-12-12)