• Kant's Critique of Beauty and Taste: Explorations Into a Philosophical Aesthetics

      Seerveld, Calvin; Zuidervaart, Lambert Paul; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1975-09)
    • Karl Polanyi and the Social Embeddedness of Economic Life: a Critique of the rationality assumption in economics

      Marshall, Paul; Woods, David; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1987-08)
      Economic rationality refers to the efficient use of resources so as to satisfy human ends as fully as possible. Rationality, taken in this sense, has been a consistent and important theme in the history of economic thought. Only in this century however has rationality been explicitly formulated as a basic assumption of individual behaviour in economic theory. [Partial abstract taken from thesis]
    • Kingfishers and Criteria: a New Approach to the Engineering Design Method

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Groenewold, Benjamin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2006-10)
      The usual method of designing a solution for a problem, which applies general principles to a specific situation, tends to overlook the unique features of each situation and so must inevitably efface the very structure of what it means to create, and so resolve diversity and plurality into blank uniformity. This is grave problem which a renewed attention to the individuality of things might help resolve. This project considers the criticism of several thinkers (including John Duns Scotus, Martin Heidegger, Theodor Adorno, and J.C. Jones) on the schema of general and particular that undergirds the engineering design method. It then seeks to open up further the suggestions these thinkers have for a new approach to the design method not enthralled to an understanding of general categories, but grounded in a contemplation of the individual.
    • Kuyper's Razor? Rethinking Science and Religion, Trinitarian Scholarship and God’s Eternity

      Coletto, Renato; School of Philosophy, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa (AOSIS OpenJournals, 2015-05)
      This article explores three research fields in contemporary Christian scholarship and argues that the way they are approached is often questionable due to the basic assumptions, the methods or the implications. The following allegations are proposed. Research on the relationship between religion and science is based on a framework of assumptions which does not reflect the biblical standpoint properly. Trinitarian scholarship expects too much from the presumed correspondence between Trinity and created reality, whilst it tends to neglect other resources available to Christian scholarship. Scientific reflection on God’s eternity is speculative in as much as it tries to transcend the modal horizon of knowledge. In these three cases (other cases are also briefly mentioned) it is argued that ‘Kuyper’s razor’ (an approach promoted in the Kuyperian reformational tradition) would help rethinking research in these areas.
    • Leadership: Vision and Mission

      Blomberg, Doug; Institute for Christian Studies; Stockwell, Clinton (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
    • Learning as Transcendence: The Solution to the Learner's Paradox in Plato and Merleau-Ponty

      Hoff, Shannon; Sheridan, Joanna; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-05)
      This thesis attempts to resolve the learner's paradox on the basis of Merleau-­Ponty's insights in the Phenomenology of Perception by showing that the paradox is misleading in at least two important ways: it presumes that our "knowing" relation to the world operates in the form of explicit knowledge, whereas really we mainly operate on the basis of a pre-­reflective familiarity with various things; and, it presumes that we are "in charge" of our learning, whereas really learning is part of the ongoing coupling of self and world. The first chapter offers a reading of Plato's Meno that argues that Plato implicitly offers a solution to the paradox that is compatible with Merleau-­Ponty's. The second chapter explicates Merleau-­Ponty's own version of the learner's paradox. The third chapter criticizes the learner's paradox from the Meno using Merleau-­Ponty's insights. The conclusion offers a few ideas on what shape teaching should take, given the foregoing account of learning, that are drawn from John Locke's "Some Thoughts Concerning Education."
    • The Legacy of Herman Dooyeweerd: Reflections on Critical Philosophy in the Christian Tradition

      Wolters, Albert M.; Olthuis, James H.; Seerveld, Calvin; McIntire, C. T.; Marshall, Paul; Hart, Hendrik; McIntire, C. T.; Institute for Christian Studies (University Press of America, 1985)
    • Letting It Get To You: Why Philosophy is a Dead End

      Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (2013-10-02)
    • Liberal Democracy and Canada's Aboriginal Peoples: Negotiating Basic Group Rights Within the Framework of Political Individualism, 1969-1988

      Marshall, Paul A.; Schouls, Timothy A.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1989-09)
    • Liberal Progressivism and Public Policy: A Foundational Analysis of Unemployment Insurance in Canada

      Marshall, Paul A.; Hogeterp, Michael C.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1995-10)
    • Liberating Emergence: Human Dependence and Autonomy in Emergentism, Hermeneutics, and Pragmatism

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Johnson, Matthew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2014-08)
      This thesis traces a thread that runs through emergentism in analytical philosophy and the thought of five philosophers: Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Charles Taylor, John Dewey, and Richard Rorty. I suggest that the insight that connects all of these thinkers is precisely the insight that undergirds a theory of “strong emergence,” which acknowledges that in certain systems, properties emerge that exert causal influence on the system out of which they emerged. Strong emergence offers a helpful “third way” to describe human personhood that is neither reductionistic nor dualistic and maintains that the human person is both dependent upon and (within certain limits) autonomous from the system out of which it emerges. I will suggest that the hermeneutic philosophy of Heidegger, Gadamer, and Taylor clarifies the historical cultural conditions out of which the human person emerges as a critical and creative agent in a way that similarly maintains a balance between the dependence and autonomy of the human person. Dewey and Rorty, on the other hand, provide accounts of human situatedness but emphasize the creative freedom that emerges out of this situatedness, characterizing humans as artists or poets who can engage with their situatedness in novel ways. For both Dewey and Rorty, our ability to shape the future and to shape ourselves is built into our experience in the world. I will conclude that each of these five thinkers develop accounts of human personhood that resonate with strong emergence, describing how human persons are able to emerge out of their embeddedness in the world, upon which they remain ever dependent, as creative innovators.
    • Living at the Crossroads: Ethical Scholarship and the Common Good

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (2011-10-24)
    • Love's Circumscriptions - the self in hide(ing) - : Surviving and Reviving the Truth

      Olthuis, James H.; Leaman, Michele; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2005-11)
      I trace Jacques Derrida's notions of self and truth in Circumfession. This text paints a gruesome self-portrait depicting the inescapable violence of subjectivity. The self is born in blood. Derrida courageously confesses to being a casualty of this lovelessness. Similarly, exploring the depth of patriarchy's inscriptions requires facing the painful truth of my bleeding self. Investigating these wounds seems to reopen them, making me complicit in my own oppression. Drawing from the rich narrative of Ingeborg Bachmann's novel Malina, I allow feminists such as Helene Cixous, Luce Irigaray, Drucilla Cornell and bell hooks to engage Derrida's notions of the wounded and wounding self. Beginning in this bloody place, they attempt to write a way-out of the disempowering systems of subjectivity to which the female self seems confined. They write in order that love will bleed some light on the struggle for empowered female subjectivity, re-writing the self as a space of love rather than violence.
    • Love, Understanding and the Mystical Knowledge of God

      Sweetman, Robert; Goering, Joseph; Guardiani, Francesco; Silano, Giulio; Institute for Christian Studies (LEGASNew York, 2002)
      I propose to explore the relationship between love, understanding and mysti­cal knowledge of God in Eckhart. It contrasts as it must to the "voluntarism" of the Bernadine tradition. So how does Eckhart see God in mystical union with, as he calls it, "the eyes of love"?
    • M. C. Smit Collection. Handwritten Notes Collection. Fond 001-002

      Smit, Meijer Cornelius, 1911-1981; Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016)
    • M.C. Smit Collection. Correspondence Collection. Fond 001-0011

      Smit, Meijer Cornelius, 1911-1981; Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016)
    • M.C. Smit Collection. Dissertation Supervision Documents. Fond 001-004

      Smit, Meijer Cornelius, 1911-1981; Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016)
    • M.C. Smit Collection. Manuscripts. Fond: 001-001

      Smit, Meijer Cornelius, 1911-1981; Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016)
    • M.C. Smit Collection. Miscellaneous Documents. Fond 001-009

      Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016)