• Interview with Richard Kearney (Art Talks, October 13, 2012)

      Smick, Rebekah; Kearney, Richard; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2012-10-13)
    • Working Through the Trauma of Evil: An Interview With Richard Kearney

      Kirby, Joseph Morrill; Institute for Christian Studies (Cascade Books, 2012)
      In this interview, the Irish philosopher Richard Kearney explores the human experience of evil and the role of the human imagination in responding to this evil. Kearney focuses on the healing steps people may take in order to "work through" traumatic experience, steps that include remembering, narrative retelling, and mourning. Such working through, he says, can turn melancholia to mourning, thus allowing those who have experienced suffering and loss to "give a future to their past" and, in so doing, to "go on."
    • Living at the Crossroads: Ethical Scholarship and the Common Good

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (2011-10-24)
    • A Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music

      Smick, Rebekah; Zuidervaart, Lambert; Toronto School of Theology; Royal Conservatory of Music; Institute for Christian Studies (University of Toronto Press, 2011)
      The question of how music relates to our existence as ethical beings has not always elicited the same response. For much of the twentieth century, the relation between music and ethics was addressed from the angle of music's autonomy. Music was fenced off from society so that it might better fulfill its own internal demands. Thus, in answer to the question whether music has, or should have, an ethical dimension, the predominating philosophical answer of the twentieth century was solidly negative. The article that follows, a response to this negative point of view, reproduces a panel discussion that took place in April 2010 during a conference entitled "Songs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music." Co-organized by the Institute for Christian Studies, the Toronto School of Theology, and the Royal Conservatory of Music, the conference attempted to bring to the musical arts a concern to re-evaluate the social significance of artistic experience and practice. Though not argued like an essay, the article highlights significant themes about the relationship of music to ethics, including the innately social character of music, its possible effect on our behaviour, the potential social content of sound itself, the positive social effect of music's ambiguity, the need to break down the barriers between music practitioners and interpreters, the role communities might play in sponsoring the work of musicians, and the possible compatibility between music's formal requirements and its potential for social engagement.
    • On (Not) Obeying the Sabbath: Reading Jesus Reading Scripture

      Ansell, Nicholas; Institute for Christian Studies (Brill, 2011)
    • Turning Memory into Prophecy: Roberto Unger and Paul Ricoeur on the Human Condition Between Past and Future

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Institute for Christian Studies (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011)
    • Christian Schooling: A Spiritual Act of Worship

      Blomberg, Doug; Institute for Christian Studies (Christian Educators Journal Association, 2010-02)
    • Religion in Public: Passages From Hegel's Philosophy of Right

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (University of Toronto, 2010)
      This article argues that religion is a public matter. The discussion proceeds in two stages. First I give a normative account of religion, the state, and their dialectical relationship. After proposing a new account of "religious truth," I suggest that religion has both critical and utopian roles toward the state. Then the essay examines the political and economic roles of religion in civil society, where religion both incubates civil-societal organizations and disturbs civil-societal patterns. I conclude that religious truth, properly understood, is not incompatible with democratic communication. Contra Richard Rorty, religion is not a "conversation-stopper."
    • Earth’s Lament: Suffering, Hope, and Wisdom [Rev. version]

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (2009-01-27)
    • Unfinished Business: Toward a Reformational Conception of Truth

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Professor of Philosophy at the Institute for Christian Studies (Association for Reformational Philosophy, 2009)
      This essay presents an emerging conception of truth and shows how it appropriates Herman Dooyeweerd’s conception. First I compare my “critical hermeneutics” with other reformational models of critique. Then I propose to think of truth as a dynamic correlation between (1) human fidelity to societal principles and (2) a life-giving disclosure of society. This conception recontextualizes the notion of propositional truth, and it links questions of intersubjective validity with Dooyeweerd’s emphasis on “standing in the truth.” While abandoning his idea of transcendent truth, I seek to preserve the holism and normativity of Dooyeweerd’s radical conception.
    • Review of Adorno: the Recovery of Experience, by Roger Foster

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (Philosophy Education Society, Inc., 2008-12)
    • Thinking Deeply About Our Faith

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (CRC Publications, 2008-11)
    • Why We Don't Join Institutions Anymore

      Institute for Christian Studies (2008-09-27)
    • Will This Church Have Children?

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (2008-09-27)
    • After Dooyeweerd: Truth in Reformational Philosophy

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (2008-08)
      A transformed idea of truth is central to the project of reformational philosophy. This paper lays groundwork for such an idea by critically retrieving Herman Dooyeweerd’s conception of truth. Section 1 explicates relevant passages in A New Critique of Theoretical Thought. Section 2 demonstrates several problems in Dooyeweerd’s conception: he misconstrues religious truth, misconceives its relation to theoretical truth, and overlooks central questions of epistemology and truth theory. Section 3 proposes an alternative reformational conception of truth, in five stages. First I compare my “critical hermeneutics” with other reformational models of critique. Then I summarize my account of artistic truth and indicate its origins in reformational ontology. Next I sketch my general conception of truth and show how it responds to issues in Dooyeweerd’s conception. Then I take up the topics of objectivity and propositional truth. Finally I introduce the notion of “authentication” as a way to appropriate insights from Dooyeweerd’s emphasis on “standing in the Truth.” While abandoning his idea of transcendent truth, I seek to preserve the holism and normativity of Dooyeweerd’s radical conception.
    • Faith as the Art of the Possible: Invigorating Religious Tradition in an Amnesiac Society

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Institute for Christian Studies (The Other Journal, 2008-03-31)
    • Dooyeweerd's Conception of Truth: Exposition and Critique

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Institute for Christian Studies (Association for Reformational Philosophy, 2008)
      A transformed idea of truth is central to the project of reformational philosophy. This essay lays groundwork for such an idea by proposing a critical retrieval of Herman Dooyeweerd's conception of truth. First it summarizes relevant passages in Dooyeweerd's New Critique. Then it demonstrates several problems in his conception: he misconstrues religious truth, misconceives its relation to theoretical truth, and overlooks central questions of epistemology and truth theory. By addressing these problems, reformational philosophers can find new ways to think about truth that retain the holism, normativity, and radicalness of Dooyeweerd’s conception.
    • Exempla and the Promotion of Religious Identity: Gerard of Frachet's Vitae Fratrum

      Sweetman, Robert; Goering, Joseph; Guardiani, Francesco; Silano, Giulio; Institute for Christian Studies (LEGASNew York, 2008)
      This paper will examine the pedagogy of the exemplary vignette as a means of "mass" identity formation within the Dominican Order and among its far flung support­ers. In the process, I make the case that Cistercian Conrad of Eberbach's earlier Exor­dium Magnum provided a model for a Dominican "memory" and the identity that shared memory was to ensure.