• Sigmund Freud's Model of Transference: a Developmental History

      Olthuis, James H.; Van Wyk, Kenneth; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1987)
      I propose to examine the major statements by Freud on the topic of transference and counter-transference. This will not be exhaustive, rather the chosen statments will serve as foci for demonstrating major philosophical and anthropological changes which occur during Freud's development of psychoanalytic theory. [p.1]
    • Soliciting the Decisions of Philosophy: An Exposition of "Plato's Pharmacy" by Jacques Derrida

      Seerveld, Calvin; Adkins, Brent; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1994)
    • Speaking Bodies: Communication and Freedom in Fichte and Merleau-Ponty

      Hoff, Shannon; Morrisey, Jeffrey James; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2012-05)
      Drawing on the ideas of J.G. Fichte and M. Merleau-Ponty, I argue that experience and freedom are intersubjective, linguistic, and bodily. In the first chapter, I take up Fichte's three "fundamental principles" from the Science of Knowledge alongside his ideas of embodiment and intersubjectivity from the Foundations of Natural Right to show that all experience is an indefinite mixture of self and not-self, and, therefore, that both the experiences of self-consciousness and its freedom must also be accomplished with reference to the not-self, and particularly others. The second chapter is an examination of Merleau-Ponty's account of expression in his Phenomenology of Perception. The key insight I pursue here is that the medium of expression, which makes possible all significance, is bodily and intersubjective, and that any expressive act is therefore both self-opaque and soliciting cooperation. In the end, I turn to how this cooperation, i.e. freedom, should be enacted.
    • Speech as Metaphor of Human Becoming According to St. Augustine of Hippo

      Marshall, Paul A.; Filipenko, Yana; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2000)
    • The Spirituality of Labour: Simone Weil's Quest for Transcendence

      Marshall, Paul A.; Selles, Johanna Maria; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1983-10)
    • Tracing Ruth in the Straits and Islands of Im/emigrant Blood: Be/longing in Rootedness and Routedness

      Olthuis, James H.; Lai, Anthony D.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1999)
    • Translation of the Implicit: Tracing How Language Works Beyond Gendlin and Derrida

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Huisman, Jelle; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2012)
      This thesis discusses the explication of the implicit side of language, from the perspective of the self, the social, and the text, as situated in the wider context of thinking about language 'beyond post-modernism.' Language is first discussed as an intricacy, an intricate and changing complex of explicit signs and implicit elements and processes. It is shown that the implicit processes, such the speaking of being (Heidegger), focusing (Gendlin), and the interrelatedness of language and culture (Agar), are ruptured by processes like deconstruction (Derrida) and the semiotic breach of the symbolic (Kristeva). Explication brings a part of the implicit to the surface in the form of creativity (Deleuze) and critique, which is also discussed in the examples of play (Gadamer) and care. The transformations involved are illustrated in reflections on writing (Plato), poetry (Trakl), life as immigrant, and on translation as a philosophical practice.
    • Trudeau's Political Philosophy: Its Implications for Liberty and Progress

      Zylstra, Bernard; Hiemstra, John L.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1983)
    • "Two Things at the Same Time": Fordoblelse in Kierkegaard's Writings

      Sweetman, Robert; Mackie, Carolyn J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2014-11)
      The term fordoblelse—usually translated as “redoubling” in English—is found relatively infrequently in Kierkegaard’s corpus and has posed something of a puzzle for scholars. In this thesis, I trace Kierkegaard’s use of the term throughout his writings, seeking to determine the common ground between the rather disparate ways in which fordoblelse appears. I explore the relationship between redoubling and such major Kierkegaardian themes as indirect communication, paradox, and the constitution of the self, and I attempt to tease out the similarities and divergences between redoubling and two other Kierkegaardian terms, “repetition” and “reduplication.” Ultimately, I conclude that redoubling functions for Kierkegaard as a structural term that provides him with a vocabulary to describe the many paradoxes at work in Christian faith.
    • Unwrapping the Gift: Empty Notion or Valuable Concept?

      Sweetman, Robert; Polce, Jonathon Emil; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-05)
      The concept of the gift has received ample philosophical attention in recent decades. Thinkers such as Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Marion have been major contributors to the conversation philosophically. However, their conclusions around the gift -- while generating many fruitful notions -- leave the gift impoverished from our ordinary experience. Further, their reflections make it difficult to predicated giftedness of existence. This thesis argues for a need to rethink the gift along different lines which seeks to widen the gift in order to be able to predicate it of existence. In order to make such an argument, the ideas of Kenneth Schmitz on the gift are recovered. Schmitz argues for an understanding of giftedness that includes a notion of reciprocity and receptivity -- contra Marion and Derrida. It is this notion of receptivity that makes Schmitz' framework able to be predicated of existence. Existence, understood as gifted, opens up fruitful avenues for anthropology and ethics, as well as argues for a certain disposition towards reality that is centered in wonder and gratitude.
    • What Children Can Do: a Polycultural Garden Theory of Development for Education

      Blomberg, Doug; Huinink, Kevin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2012-05)
      Limitation theories in developmental psychology have had a profound effect on educational practice; namely, theories that have been widely used to define what is developmentally inappropriate for children to do. Current research is presented to suggest new ways to think about the abilities of children and to challenge the popular applications of limitation theories. Modal theory as understood by reformed Christian philosophies is presented in a framework to view human development. The result is a new polycultural (cosmonomically diverse) theory of human development. Holistic education is investigated as a possible ally by comparing and contrasting it to the proposed theory and its application to education. Finally, the image and metaphor of a garden are introduced to enhance this polycultural theory and to offer application with suggestions for further study.
    • World Views and Social Involvement: A Proposal for Classification of Canadian Neo-Calvinist Social Involvement, 1945-1980

      Marshall, Paul A.; Kits, Harry J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1988)
    • "Zus en Zo over Dit en Dat": an Essay on the Concept of Function in the Systematic Philosophy of Herman Dooyeweerd

      Hart, Hendrik; Wolters, Albert M.; Recker, Perry; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977)